Sneak peek into an estranged world. Cheers!

Posts tagged ‘Christmas’

A prayer on the side

Today I want to share with you the story of Charbel.

Charbel lives in a small house is bcharre, North of Mount Lebanon, a small village where summers are harsh and winters are worse.

He’s a man with 7 kids, 3 girls and 4 boys, each of these kids working hard day and night to suffice to their family’s needs. My family and I have helped them through school, when they got scholarships to prefect their knowledge.

Charbel is a man who paints houses in summer and works on the ski slopes in winter.

Charbel here lost his summer job to Syrian refugees. They offerthe samepaint job done in less time and more employees, for a cheaper wage.

He says it’s OK, they have a family to care for as well; because of his kind heart he doesn’t blame them, he says they need to feed their families too.

Tonight is Christmas night. So I Want to send out my love and best wishes to Charbel and his family.

May they prosper in peace and love and the best of luck that most of us comfortable in our warm homes might not be worthy of.

Merry Christmas to the Succar family. You’ll always be in my heart, knowing all the life lessons you taught me and the many times you opened my eyes to reality.

Have a drink and a prayer directed to them on this holy night.

Cheers
T.

Hadath el Jebbe decorations

As promised in my previous post On the road to arez where Hadath eh Jebbe was mentioned .Here are pictures of the Christmas decorations all over the area,  making the pass through the village much better than that of the highway passing under it.
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T.

Hasroun, a history of architecture in lights

As you well know Christmas is getting closer, so decorations are being put up all around Lebanon, in preparation for the festivities. So as usual, on my drive up from Beirut to the Cedars, I once again passed by the village of Hasroun.

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Hasroun village view

It is a small village with small roads and houses glued to each other to help the town people survive the cold days of winter. It is built on the side of the mountain, facing North, which in other words means it only gets a couple of hours of sun a day at an altitude of nearly 1600m (5200ft). Its name comes from the Hasrun flower that used to predominant in the area, giving it its nickname the Rose of the Mountain.
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Having the houses so closely interlinked, the villagers came up with one of the most beautiful (in my opinion) Christmas lighting that stay on during all winter, making the village a beautiful show at night.

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Glued houses in Hasroun

The decorations are simple, using tube lights, many meters of them, to show and enhance the old architecture of the area, delimiting the roads and houses, as well as all home and shop entrances.

So without extra babbling from my part, here are a few pictures I took last weekend, where I noticed that not only did they put up the same decorations, but they also added colors to this year’s festivities.

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Entrance of Hasroun

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Balconies of Hasroun

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Street view of Hasroun

As you can see the whole area is lit in the most simple type of decoration, yet gives the village a beautiful feel when entering it. Not only do they add these light snakes on door entrances, but balconies, fences, and windows were added to the festive season, depicting a different  outlook on the whole area.
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If you’re ever around Lebanon around the festive season, I say Hasroun is a must see at night, walk or drive through, to get the ultimate experience, as well of course as Hadath el Jebbe, as depicited in my previous post, On the road to Arez.

Cheers from between the arms of Alexa storm.

T.

A Christmas feel

Pretty amazing how the first of December suddenly becomes key-word to Christmas gift shopping, carols and songs being played all over the radio and decoration filling out our living rooms.

Living in Lebanon, a nation where many religions collide, we get the most vacations ever (I’m serious, at least a day or two for each holiday), whether it be Ashoura, Adha, Christmas, Easter, etc. It is through these holidays that you see the people finally unite so all will be able to get enough holidays.

Arab countries in general only take Islamic holidays (Saudi, UAE, Dubai etc), European countries follow the Christian holidays, while American (I’m not positive about this one but friends living there mentioned it a couple of times, so please correct me if I’m wrong) follow Christian and Jewish holidays.

Add them all together they will amount to nearly 15 days a year, seeing that we join all cultures and religions in one state, we get a month off for holidays a year, and still find a way to nag about not getting enough days off work.

So for those that haven’t bought their gifts yet, they better hurry, as for me, I already got them a couple of month ago to save myself from the price raises due to the holidays. 21 days left. Good luck!

On a nicer note, here is a video of the 7 best light-shows spread all over the world, unfortunately making it impossible for Lebanon to join because of our electricity cuts and living in apartment buildings not houses.

Pre-Merry Christmas to all

T.

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